Robert Hutchinson

Partner

Nairobi

Hutch leads & manages the Control Risks’ East Africa business where he supports clients to be secure, resilient and compliant in their market entry, operations and growth across a footprint of ten countries. Hutch is based in Nairobi, Kenya and specialises in advice to business leaders and investors on matters relating to enterprise risk, business resilience and crisis management.

  • Africa

Hutch leads & manages the Control Risks’ East Africa business where he supports clients to be secure, resilient and compliant in their market entry, operations and growth across a footprint of ten countries. Hutch is based in Nairobi, Kenya and specialises in advice to business leaders and investors on matters relating to enterprise risk, business resilience and crisis management. 

Before joining Control Risks, Hutch served, as a commissioned officer in the British Army, for ten years and served on active duty on three operational deployments. Hutch’s career culminated, after Staff College, in developing cross governmental cyber policy. 

Following his time in the military, Hutch worked in support a FTSE registered extractive company before joining PwC as their Africa Business Resilience Director supporting over 9,000 partners and staff across over 16 countries in the sub-Saharan region. 


Highlights of Hutch’s experience include:
  • Crisis management support to an extractive facing a multi-billion (USD) regulatory fine related to ESG matters.
  • Developing regional enterprise risk management and business resilience programmes.  
  • Assessing, monitoring and shaping market entry and operational risk management in Ethiopia and Sudan.
  • Developing and delivering incident management and business continuity training to business leaders.

 

Hutch read law at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth and Legal Practice at the College of Law. 

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