Martin Baghdadi

Director

Sydney

Martin Baghdadi is a Director based in Control Risks’ Sydney office. Martin has considerable experience managing complex projects and business operations including pre-market entry in hostile environments. He has advised and consulted to numerous multinationals across a broad range of sectors, including government, military, infrastructure, financial, and oil and gas.

  • Asia Pacific
  • Business Intelligence
  • Crisis Management & Business Continuity Strategy Planning
  • Market Entry Assessment


Martin Baghdadi is a Director based in Control Risks’ Sydney office. Martin has considerable experience managing complex projects and business operations including pre-market entry in hostile environments. He has advised and consulted to numerous multinationals across a broad range of sectors, including government, military, infrastructure, financial, and oil and gas.


Martin has provided services including:
  • Crisis management, Threat and risk assessments
  • Community engagement and relationship management
  • Pre-entry market assessments, New market industry regulatory benchmarking, Stakeholder mapping
  • Business intelligence and due diligence reporting, Anti-bribery and corruption assessments and workshops
  • Security design projects


Martin is a fluent Arabic speaker and holds a bachelor of business marketing from Monash University in Victoria. He is currently completing a master’s degree in political relations and counterterrorism. He is GRCP (Governance, Risk, and Compliance Professional) certified and has a Top Secret Positive Vet.

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