Lucy James

Associate Consultant

London

Lucy is an Associate Consultant for Control Risks’ Africa team, focusing on political, operational and security analysis in Anglophone West Africa. Aside from contributing to Control Risks’ subscription services Country Risk Forecast (CRF) and PRIME, Lucy carries out research for continent-wide consultancy engagements.

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  • Creating a Resilient Organisation
  • Delivering Growth and Opportunity


Lucy is an Associate Consultant for Control Risks’ Africa team, focusing on political, operational and security analysis in Anglophone West Africa. Aside from contributing to Control Risks’ subscription services Country Risk Forecast (CRF) and PRIME, Lucy carries out research for continent-wide consultancy engagements.


Some of Lucy's engagements include:
  • Regional benchmarking of mining sector policy and management in West Africa.
  • An assessment of community and human rights risks for a manufacturing company seeking to operate in Uganda. 
  • A regular briefing service for a regional oil and gas company on the 2016-17 political crisis in Gambia.


Prior to joining Control Risks, Lucy worked for AKE Group covering Africa and at the thinktank Demos, where she was involved in a project looking at reports of violence and electoral malpractice during Nigeria’s 2015 elections. She has previously worked in global health for the GAVI Alliance in Geneva and for the British Institute in East Africa in Nairobi.

Lucy holds a degree in Politics, Psychology and Sociology from the University of Cambridge and a Masters in African Politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies, where her research focused on the role of religious mediation in African civil conflicts.

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