Ling Jin

Director

Hong Kong

Ling Jin is a Director in Control Risks Greater China and North Asia. Based in Hong Kong, Ling leads Control Risks business development efforts and is responsible for key client relationships with Chinese companies in Hong Kong, Macau and Southern China.

  • Asia Pacific
  • Creating a Resilient Organisation
  • Political and Economic Risk Consulting


Ling Jin is a Director in Control Risks Greater China and North Asia. Based in Hong Kong, Ling leads Control Risks business development efforts and is responsible for key client relationships with Chinese companies in Hong Kong, Macau and Southern China.

Ling is a specialist in strategy development, government affairs, partnership building and crisis management. With a career spanning media and consultancy, she has extensive experience advising senior executives of multinational companies and organizations across many industries.


Examples of Ling's work include:

  • Provided overseas investment risk assessment briefings and engagement recommendations to senior executives of a leading Chinese investment fund for their mature markets and gateway cities strategy. 
  • Engaged by several of China’s leading healthcare companies and trade associations to map out the political and regulatory challenges in the US market and support business partner matchmaking.
  • Provided overseas investment risk assessment briefings and engagement recommendations to senior executives of a leading Chinese investment fund for their mature markets and gateway cities strategy.
  • Key trainer of a government engagement and risk mitigation workshop for a major US food company in China.
  • Helped an Australian logistics company expand its central government engagement outreach to NDRC, China's top economic planner, by developing a joint research and advocacy project with its affiliated think tank. 

Having previously led Control Risks’ government affairs consulting practice in Greater China and North Asia, Ling continues to manage key relationships with Chinese government agencies, industry associations and think tanks to build risk awareness and risk management capability in the Chinese market. She is currently vice-chair of the China Business Committee of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong. 

Before joining Control Risks, Ling ran the Hong Kong office for APCO Worldwide, a US government affairs and strategic communications consultancy. She also led the international trade and investment promotion effort for the State of Missouri USA in Greater China, and worked for JL McGregor & Company, the Washington Post’s Beijing bureau and China Central Television (CCTV).  Ling has a Bachelor’s degree from China Universities for Nationalities. She also completed a mid-career graduate study in the News and Mass Communication Institute at the People’s University in Beijing.

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