Borbala Rojahn

Senior Consultant

Berlin

Borbála Rojahn is a Senior Consultant in the Compliance, Forensics and Intelligence team of Control Risks in Berlin. Specialising in cases in Eastern Europe and the German-language countries, she is versed in fraud investigations, integrity due diligence and providing ethics and compliance consultancy.

  • Europe
  • Resolving Critical Issues and Crises
  • Creating a Compliant Organisation
  • Delivering Growth and Opportunity


Borbála Rojahn is a Senior Consultant in the Compliance, Forensics and Intelligence team of Control Risks in Berlin. Specialising in cases in Eastern Europe and the German-language countries, she is versed in fraud investigations, integrity due diligence and providing ethics and compliance consultancy. She has participated in compliance reviews and transaction testing and has offered business integrity risk consulting to international companies operating in the region.


In recent projects, Borbála has:
  • Participated in an anti-corruption risk assessment of the German operations of an international engineering company. The work was composed of interviews with key company personnel, process walkthroughs with key control owners, data analysis, document review and testing of company transactions to identify potential corruption risks to the client’s business. Control Risks recommended mitigating steps to address those risks, which were not adequately addressed by the existing internal controls.  
  • Led an investigation into allegations of counterfeiting of a high-value product of a multinational pharmaceutical company in Hungary. The investigation included public record research, discreet enquiries with sources from the pharmaceutical sector familiar with the operations of the companies which were alleged to counterfeit the client’s products, as well as several site visits. Control Risks could refute the allegations.
  • Carried out a review of the compliance management system of a medical services company in Hungary, Poland and Romania. This included a corruption risk assessment, gap analysis of existing compliance policies and procedures and recommendations for improvement. 
  • Led an investigation into concerns raised by an anonymous whistleblower at the Slovakian subsidiary of a multinational pharmaceutical company regarding a potential conflict of interest. The investigation was composed of investigative interviews, email and document reviews.  
  • Investigated a fraud case at the German operations of a multinational company. This company had fallen victim to an organised crime gang, which  had convinced the client’s controller to transfer a significant amount of money to a third party in Slovakia, using social engineering techniques. 


Before joining Control Risks, Borbála was a researcher in a research project financed by the Robert Bosch Foundation, which looked at sustainable agricultural development in Eastern Europe and East Africa. The project was hosted by the Centre for Development Research in Bonn, Germany. Previously, Borbála worked as an operative controller at Praktiker Ltd. in Budapest (Hungary), where she was in charge of building and developing the operative controlling area.

Borbála holds a B.Sc. in international business from the Babes-Bolyai University of Cluj, Romania, and a master’s degree in economics from the Central European University in Budapest. Her work for the Centre for Development Research led to her being awarded a Ph.D. by the Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Bonn. In addition, Borbála holds the credential of Certified Fraud Examiner with the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners and the credential of Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC) professional from the Open Compliance and Ethics Group (OCEG). Borbála is an ethnic Hungarian, born in Romania. She speaks fluent Hungarian, Romanian, English and German.

FIND OUT MORE

Can our experts help you?

Related content

Analysis

Automotive brief: September 2017 - UK and Brexit

In the months following the UK’s vote to leave the EU, the government gave assurances to Nissan that Brexit would not adversely affect its UK operations. This gave hope to the sector that the government was prioritising car manufacturing and that the sector had little to fear.