Report

Security briefing for major sporting events

  • Americas
  • Brazil
  • Creating a Secure Organisation
Security briefing for major sporting events

 

This summer the greatest international sporting event will shift the world’s focus to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The games will take place from 5–21 August and 7–18 September. In addition to the games taking place in Rio, the football tournament will be held in: Manaus, Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Salvador and São Paulo. Participating athletes from 206 countries will compete in a total of 665 events that up to 500,000 international spectators are expected to attend—as well as a considerable number of domestic tourists. 

Businesses and visiting personnel will face a number of logistical and security challenges across the country. Crime and public safety will be the most pressing concerns, though significant disruption to travel and logistics is also anticipated due to protests. Demand for hotel accommodations, air travel and other travel-related services will also increase, posing additional logistical challenges for visitors. 

 

In this report: 
  • The main security concerns
  • Protests during the sporting events
  • Health-related risks
  • The main logistical challenges to bear in mind
  • Security recommendations

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