Report

Political Violence and Crime Incident Report, Q2 2017

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Political Violence and Crime Incident Report, Q2 2017


Our Political Violence and Crime Incident Report Q3 is based on our incident mapping and analysis service. It is a quarterly report designed to help organisations gain a better understanding of incident trends throughout the year, using our new risk monitoring tool CORE. The report analyses global incidents of war, terrorism, unrest and crime, with commercial relevance.

 

Find out about:
  • The 9,778 incidents recorded worldwide this quarter
  • The global distribution of incidents by country
  • Distribution by region and target (military, government, financial, public spaces, etc.)
  • The total number of incidents by category (war, terrorism, unrest and crime)
  • Incidents by tactic (firearms, IED, strikes, vehicles, etc.)

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