Podcast

Kidnap-for-ransom in Mozambique, a threat that’s expected to rise

  • Africa
  • Mozambique
  • Creating a Secure Organisation
Kidnap-for-ransom in Mozambique, a threat that’s expected to rise


Mozambique’s kidnap environment has stayed steady over the last few years, with one of the most active criminal kidnap-for-ransom environments in Sub-Saharan Africa, although it also has a history of insurgency and politically-related kidnapping.

With increased foreign investment in the oil and gas sector in the north, and investment in other sectors elsewhere in the country, the pool of potential kidnap victims will grow. Control Risks foresees an increase in the kidnapping-for-ransom threat as a result.

This podcast will examine: 
    • Mozambique’s current kidnap environment
    • Tactics used and who is most targeted  
    • Which regions have the highest rate of kidnap incidents  
    • How organisations can mitigate this threat 

 

 

 

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